Fenimore

Fenimore Art Museum

The Fenimore Art Museum Receives an Important Collection of Native American Art and Two New Acquisitions

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y., September 4, 2007—The Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York, has received many notable gifts in recent months including a substantial Native American collection from the Barbar Conable family, a contemporary Native American work from Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw, and a historic musical instrument and landscape painting from Patricia B. Selch in memory of Eric Selch.

The Barbar Conable family’s Native American collection comprises eighty objects including several artifacts of Iroquois origin dating from the early 17th through the 20th century, which provide an excellent opportunity for the Fenimore Art Museum to tell a richer story of life in 18th- and 19th-century New York. Many of the objects will be used in a hands-on capacity in the museum’s Mohawk Bark House, a recreated 18th-century Iroquois hunting and fishing lodge, located on the shore of legendary Otsego Lake, while others will be on view in the museum’s galleries. Of particular note is a beautifully beaded finger woven sash from the late 18th century. This stunning object incorporates white beads, a valued trade item between the European settlers and the Native Americans. The collection also features a richly detailed 1790 carved powder horn, which is an excellent example of early life on the frontier. The Plains Indians are also represented in this collection through many quilled objects, including a hair ornament, moccasins, and a hide tobacco bag.

Barbar Conable (1922-2003) was born in Warsaw, New York, a small town in the northwestern part of the state. It was there that he discovered Indian arrowheads plowed up by local farmers, which piqued his interest in Native American artifacts and formed the genesis for his lifelong passion for collection. Conable served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1965-1985 and was appointed the seventh President of the World Bank Group from 1986-1991.

The Fenimore also received a new acquisition, “When We Were There” (2006), a collage by renowned contemporary Native American artist Arthur Amiotte (Lakota), from Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw for the Thaw Collection of American Indian Art. Amiotte incorporates specific elements of the past into his work, using not only his family’s history, but also Lakota history, putting all in the context of a general, historical past. In this collage, Amiotte illustrates the travels and adventures of his great-grandfather, Standing Bear, and other Lakota peoples throughout Europe with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West traveling shows. Amiotte’s work is widely exhibited and held in many private and public collections throughout the United States. Fenimore’s season exhibition, Myth and Reality: Art of the Great Plains, features a painting depicting the Battle of Little Big Horn by Amiotte’s great-grandfather Standing Bear. “When We Were There” is currently on view in the American Indian Wing.

The Selch Collection is one of the largest private collections of historic American musical materials in the United States, and we are pleased to announce that we received a donation of a reed organ, made by A.L. Swan of Cherry Valley, New York, and patented May 7, 1850, from Patricia B. Selch in memory of Eric Selch. Frederick Selch (1930-2002) is best known as a preeminent authority on American musical instruments and musical culture and his prolific collection of musical instruments, manuscripts, books and works of art relating to American musical culture. Before being acquired by the Selches, the melodeon was in the Deansboro Musical Museum, a private collection that was open to the public for many years. It was dispersed by auction in the late 1990s.

The Selches have also given a painting, Windham Valley in the Catskills, A Tollgate on the Susquehanna Turnpike, by Henry A. Duessell, ca. 1893. This painting depicts Windham, New York during the 19th century and includes an iron bridge, residential dwellings, and the ‘Old Bump Tavern,’ shown in its original location, which is now in The Farmers’ Museum’s historic village. Also visible in the painting is a tollbooth and sawmill, relating to an earlier use of the turnpike as a plank road. The painting is on view at the entryway into the Main Gallery on the first floor of the museum.

About Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

Press Release Category: 
Recent Announcements
Publication Date: 
September 2007
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Frederic Remington Exhibition Soon to Close at the Fenimore Art Museum

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y., August 28, 2007—If you haven’t seen the exhibition Treasures from the Frederic Remington Museum at the Fenimore Art Museum yet, this is your last chance.

Closing Tuesday, September 4, 2007, the exhibition features more than 20 original paintings and drawings and four original sculptures by famed western painter and illustrator Frederic Remington (1861-1909). Culled from one of the finest Remington collections in the world, The Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg, New York, Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum, showcases not only the breadth of the artist’s work, but also the extensive Remington holdings of the art museum.

The exhibition showcases the artist’s best-known and significant works, including an 1885 watercolor, Sunday Morning Toilet on the Ranch, which is a fine example of Remington’s early devotion to the theme of cowboy ritual and camaraderie. Remington is also known for his bronzes, of which four original sculptures will be featured in the exhibition, including a fine, early example of The Broncho Buster, 1895.

Regarded as a chronicler of the American West, Frederic Remington was a multitalented artist who made a name for himself as an illustrator of western and military subjects for many of the widely circulated magazines of the late 1880s and 1890s including Harper’s Weekly, Harper’s Monthly, Century, Collier’s, Outing, Boys’ Life, and Cosmopolitan. Although highly associated with the American West, Remington spent most of his life on the east and resided in New Rochelle, New York. Born in Canton, New York, in 1861, Remington briefly attended the School of Fine Arts at Yale before traveling in the west, then beginning work as an illustrator. As a young man, he traveled widely, sketching the people and places of the new American frontier. By the mid-1880s, Remington became one of the most popular and successful illustrators of the age. Remington also found success as a writer, painter, and sculptor. In Remington’s forty-eight years, he produced over 3,000-signed paintings and drawings, 22 bronze sculptures, and wrote articles and novels that comprised eight books.

Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum was curated and organized by Laura T. Foster of The Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg, NY. Fenimore’s presentation of Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum has been sponsored in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

About Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

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For more information and images, please contact:
Christine Liggio, Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum/ New York State Historical Association
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
August 2007
Site: 

Fenimore Art Museum Offers Tea Time Thursdays

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. July 31, 2007—The Fenimore Art Museum is pleased to offer its popular family program, Tea Time Thursdays, from August 2 through 30. Patrons will enjoy a glorious morning tea from 10:00 am to 11:00 am and an insightful discussion on the history and tradition of tea time across cultures.
 
Each week’s program highlights different tea traditions from around the world as practiced in such locales as Africa, Japan, Egypt, Turkey and Morocco, as well as a program focusing on the medicinal benefits of tea. A delightful selection of treats will accompany a classic assortment of teas. Morning tea will be served on the terrace, offering beautiful views of Otsego Lake and a splendid atmosphere in which to relax and enjoy time with your family or friends.
 
Thursday, August 2: Survey of Teas
Sip a cup of Oolong while we provide an overview of various tea traditions from different regions all over the world, important technology, and tea ware. People have enjoyed many different types of tea for thousands of years. In this tea time, our guests will learn how tea is made, the characteristics of teas, and milestones in tea history, such as the invention of the teapot.
 
Thursday, August 9: African Teas
In this program, participants will discover why Rooibos and other popularized African-grown teas and tisanes are forging a new market in the tea industry. Countries in Sub- Saharan Africa like Malawi, Zimbabwe, Kenya, and South Africa are able to grow their own teas and supply the tea drinking world with subtle black teas, as well as their own “red bush” tea.
 
Thursday, August 16: Medicinal Benefits of Tea
Since its early beginnings, tea has been thought to hold medicinal properties. Presently, it is consumed mostly for enjoyment, but it was originally taken for its replenishing vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, which restore the body. Tea is also praised for its ability to promote mental clarity. Today, most cultures acknowledge the healing properties of tea, both physical and spiritual.
 
Thursday, August 23: Teas of Morocco, Egypt and Turkey
Visitors will enjoy some iced Egyptian hibiscus tea while they explore how tea time is done in Marrakech, Cairo and Istanbul. In Morocco, Egypt, and Turkey tea is a symbol of friendship, family and hospitality. Our participants will discover the color, spice and spirit of Moroccan Mint, Egyptian Hibiscus, and Turkish Black teas.
 
Thursday, August 30: Japanese Tea Ceremonies
Japan has a longstanding ritual of the tea ceremony, a tradition ritual shared among friends. Green tea is served in a sacred tea house in a highly prescribed manner; there are specific ways of doing practically everything, from cleaning the tea tools to walking through the door. Incorporating dress, fine fare, flower arrangement, and calligraphy, the Japanese ceremony is a highly aesthetic experience of relaxation and friendship.
 
Admission for Tea Time Thursdays is $5 adult members/$3 child members and $7 non-members/$5 child non-members. Reservations are required; please call (607) 547-1461.
 
About Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.
 

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For more information or images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations office
New York State Historical Association
Fenimore Art Museum/The Farmers’ Museum
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: cliggio@nysha.org
 
 
 

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
July 2007
Site: 

Fenimore Art Museum & The Farmers' Museum to Host Firefighters' Day on August 4th

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COOPERSTOWN, NY, July 27, 2007—On Saturday, August 4th, the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum will host Firefighters’ Day, a special one-day event commemorating New York State’s resplendent firefighting history. In recognition and appreciation of our dedicated firefighters, the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum will be offering complimentary admission to firefighters and their families from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. The general public is also welcome to visit the museums at regular admission prices and, as always, members of the New York State Historical Association are admitted at no cost.

The event commences with a welcoming ceremony recognizing County Fire Coordinators at 11:00 am followed by a host of firefighting related activities for families, including bucket brigades, fire hat decorating, and many more activities through 5:00 pm. The Fenimore’s circular drive will feature an impressive display of antique fire trucks from Cooperstown, Hartwick, and Milford, an 1860 hand pumper from Schoharie County, and a 1914 fire chief’s car from Mohawk Township. The Otsego County Safety Bus will be a special addition to the festivities offering educational and fun activities for children.

There will also be guided tours of the Fenimore Art Museum’s special exhibit, Folk Art On Fire, held at select times throughout the day. This exhibit features a remarkable display of antique firefighting memorabilia illustrating the rich firefighting culture of the 19th century. In the 19th century, fire companies were eager to celebrate their value to their communities by embellishing their everyday gear and ceremonial dress, and by commissioning noble portraits of firefighting heroes. In this exhibit, drawn from the collections of Robert and Katharine Booth, the Bucks County Historical Society, and the Fenimore Art Museum, viewers will see more than 70 decorative arts and objects including elaborately decorated hats, buckets, banners and clothing as well as paintings and firefighting equipment. The exhibition will be on view through December 30, 2007.

For more information, please call toll-free (888) 547-1450 or visit us online at www.fenimoreartmusuem.org or www.farmersmuseum.org.

The Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum, two distinct institutions that together explore and present the diverse history, art, and culture of rural American life, are located across from each other on Lake Road, Route 80, in Cooperstown, NY. Admission to each museum is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include both museums and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. Fenimore Art Museum is open from April 1 through December 30; The Farmers’ Museum is open from April 1 through October 31, with special events throughout the year. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org and www.farmersmuseum.org.

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For more information or images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
New York State Historical Association
Fenimore Art Museum/The Farmers’ Museum
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: cliggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
July 2007
Site: 

Six Nations Iroquois Life Tour

Grade Level: 
4th to 12th

Grade Level: 4th to 12th
Duration: 2 hours

Explore the past and present of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) through visits to our Thaw Collection of American Indian Art, Mohawk Bark House, and Seneca Log House. This immersive experience brings the study of the Six Nations to life. This opportunity can also feature a traditional Haudenosaunee hands-on craft workshop to round out your students’ visit!

School Program Type: 
tour
Duration: 
2 hours
On or off site (for workshops): 
On-site
Site: 

Selections from Fenimore's Premier Folk Art Collection are Showcased in 2007 Exhibition

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y., March 26, 2007—Selections of folk art from the permanent collection of Fenimore Art Museum are featured in American Memory: Recalling the Past in Folk Art, on view through December 30, 2007.

“This exhibition is organized in two sections that examine visual histories. National History explores the varied ways folk artists express national events. Personal History examines depictions of individuals, memories and experiences,” said Murdock, Curator of the exhibition. “Today, these artworks serve as documents of national society and the lives of the artists.”

Folk artists express through their art the events – ordinary and extraordinary – that have shaped their lives and communities. Through the process of creating, folk artists make a permanent record of their cultural ideals, experiences, and community heritage. This exhibition examines 19th- and 20th-century representations of memory in historical and personal folk art.

Memorial paintings, scenes of everyday life, quilts, woodcarvings, and other artifacts will be on exhibit in the Main Gallery at the museum. Among the most noted include “Columbia,” artist unidentified, ca. 1858, “Applique Quilt” by Anna Putney Farrington, ca. 1825-1911, and “Whig Political Banner,” ca. 1840 by Terence J. Kennedy.

About Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

###

For more information and images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum/ New York State Historical Association
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
March 2007
Site: 

Ancient American Indian Pottery on View at the Fenimore Art Museum

Press Release Contact: 

For more information and images, please contact:
Christine Liggio, Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum/ New York State Historical Association
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

COOPERSTOWN, NY, March 20, 2007—Outstanding examples of ancient American Indian pottery from the Southeastern and Southwestern regions of the United States will be featured in America’s Ancient Past: Art of the Mounds and Canyon People, opening April 1 at Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, N.Y. The exhibition will close on December 30, 2007.

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
March 2007
Site: 

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