Fenimore

Fenimore Art Museum

Fenimore Art Museum Present Stunning Display of Antique Firefighting Memorabilia

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COOPERSTOWN, NY, March 26, 2007Folk Art on Fire celebrates the camaraderie and bravery of 19th century American firefighters through a stunning display of folk art of the time. Fire companies were eager to celebrate their value to their communities by embellishing their everyday gear and ceremonial dress, and by commissioning noble portraits of firefighting heroes. In this exhibit, drawn from the collections of Robert and Katharine Booth, the Bucks County Historical Society, and Fenimore Art Museum, viewers will see more than 70 objects including elaborately decorated hats, buckets, banners and clothing as well as paintings and firefighting equipment. The exhibition will be on view through December 30, 2007.

In the pre-photographic era, many painted images documented and commented upon fires and firemen of the time. Many have become familiar icons and images that remind us of both the horror of fire and the heroism of its combatants. They are symbols of another era, rendered with varying proportions of artistic naturalism and license by both accomplished and untutored hands. They enriched everyday utilitarian objects, such as hats, buckets, oilcloth capes, trade signs and engines or fire pumpers. They have an element of whimsy and individuality that relieves the seriousness of their common theme.

Choice of symbol or theme spoke volumes about the volunteer fire company and resonated loudly in the minds of their observers. Images of well-known and secular heroes celebrated the duality of artisan and gentleman that characterized many of the individual firemen. Greek legends and classical imagery created a visual link to heroic citizens and civilizations of the past. The Liberty figure was common and represented the triumph of our new democracy and our civic freedoms.

The most lavish and imaginative decorations were reserved for the fire engines, whose condenser sides were slotted to receive oil-on-board painted panels. These were often applied for parades and removed for work.

Whatever the ultimate place of these firefighting artifacts in the spectrum of American folk art, it is important to remember that legions of our ancestors paraded proudly beneath these hats and truly treasured their buckets. That some survive to this day should remind us of the unselfish courage and personal valor of our firefighters, then and now.

David Lewis, Curator of the Aurora Regional Fire Museum in Aurora, Illinois, is the guest-scriptwriter for the exhibition.

The exhibition is sponsored in part by Robert and Katharine Booth and New York Central Mutual.

About the Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shops offer fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

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For more information and images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum/ New York State Historical Association
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
March 2007
Site: 

Special Events Volunteer

Providing a helping hand both behind the scenes and up-front for events like Candlelight Evening, Harvest Festival, the Junior Livestock Show and Sugaring Off to name a few.  Volunteers do everything from serving chili to loading wagon rides to helping with the judging of show animals.

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Senior
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Fenimore Art Museum Presents an Exploration of the American West Through the Eyes of Plains Indian Artists in New Exhibition

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COOPERSTOWN, NY, March 20, 2007—Fenimore Art Museum presents Myth and Reality: The Art of the Great Plains, an exhibition of more than 25 narrative artworks by Plains Indian artists chronicling 19th-century life and culture on the Great Plains. Drawn from Fenimore’s Thaw Collection and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, these artworks tell the stories of the Plains Indians and unravel some of the myths surrounding the Great Plains. This exhibition will be on view through December 30, 2007.

For America and most of the world, the Great Plains evokes images of painted tipis, savage buffalo hunts, and warriors on horseback wearing elaborate feather headdresses. Frederic Remington, as well as other artists, anthropologists, explorers, businessmen, and Hollywood moviemakers have all had a hand in shaping a mythic vision of the American West. These stereotypes promoted in popular culture were so pervasive that many people came to accept them as fact.

Native American artists, however, created complex and individualized renditions of the reality of their own life and times. This exhibition features Plains artists’ representations from their own culture through four distinct subject areas: Horses, Women, The “Other” and the Battle of Little Bighorn. Each subject explores a richer, more nuanced, and personalized account of life on the Great Plains as experienced by the people that lived there.

Life histories and important events, such as battles, were recorded in narrative drawings and paintings on buffalo hides, muslin and paper. This exhibition includes several pictorial representations of the well-known confrontation between the United States Cavalry and the Plains Indians, The Battle of Little Bighorn, which took place in June of 1876 in today’s south-central Montana.

Myth and Reality: The Art of the Great Plains was guest curated by Joe D. Horse Capture, A’aninin (Gros Ventre), Associate Curator, Africa, Oceania and the Americas, Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

The exhibition is funded in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

About the Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shops offer fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

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For more information and images, please contact:
Christine Liggio, Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum/ New York State Historical Association
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
March 2007
Site: 

Detailed 19th-Century Views of New York State Are Focus of Fenimore Art Museum Exhibition

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Cooperstown, New York, March 26, 2007—During the 19th century a number of artists traveled throughout the United States creating panoramic scenes of each state’s burgeoning settlements, towns, and cities. These highly detailed lithographic prints, created by artists as if seen from high above, came to be known as “bird’s-eye views.” Their representation of street patterns, prominent buildings, transportation networks and landscapes are almost photographic in detail. In addition, Bird’s-Eye views appealed to local pride and provided visual proof that a community had succeeded in the rough-and-tumble world of 19th century America.

On View from April 1 to December 30, 2007, the Fenimore Art Museum presents Panoramas of Pride: 19th-Century Bird's-Eye Views of the Empire State, an exhibition comprising impressive and remarkably accurate snapshots of many communities, large and small, across New York State. Birds-eye views recall an era when Empire State cities and towns vied to promote their interest and encourage growth. Culled from the permanent collection of the Fenimore Art Museum, the exhibition features an 1855 image of New York City and lithographs of upstate cities including Syracuse, Utica and Oswego. Each of the latter prominently depicts the network of canals that helped ensure the economic dominance of the metropolis at the mouth of the Hudson. Smaller communities were also depicted in Bird’s-Eye views during this era. Of local interest, Cooperstown, New York, was portrayed amidst the natural beauty of Otsego Lake and its surrounding hills. In such instances, it is evident that these lithographs were used to promote tourism as well as industry.

These prints are not only important historical documents but are works of art as well. Artists created these images by sketching all of the buildings on every street and each feature of the area around the community. After studying the sketches, the artist selected a "vantage point" and translated the sketches into a completed perspective illustration.

About the Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

###

For more information and images, please contact:
Christine Liggio, Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum/ New York State Historical Association
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
March 2007
Site: 

Fenimore Art Museum Presents Major Exhibition of Western Art Masterpieces by Frederic Remington

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y., May 24, 2007—This summer, Fenimore Art Museum will be home to more than 20 original paintings and drawings, and four original sculptures by famed Western painter and illustrator Frederic Remington (1861-1909). Culled from one of the finest Remington collections in the world, The Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg, New York, Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum, showcases not only the breadth of the artist’s work, but also the extensive Remington holdings of the art museum. This major exhibition premieres Saturday, May 26th, at Fenimore Art Museum and will be on view through September 4th.

The exhibition highlights the comprehensive collection of the Frederic Remington Art Museum with the showcase of the artist’s best-known and significant works, including an 1885 watercolor, Sunday Morning Toilet on the Ranch, which is a fine example of Remington’s early devotion to the theme of cowboy ritual and camaraderie. The exhibition also features examples of many of Remington’s illustrations, including the 1888 oil on board One of the Boys, one of many works he produced for an important early commission to illustrate six stories of Theodore Roosevelt’s western exploits in The Century. Remington is also known for his bronzes, of which four original sculptures will be featured in the exhibition, including a fine, early example of The Broncho Buster, 1895.

Regarded as a chronicler of the American West, Frederic Remington was a multitalented artist who made a name for himself as an illustrator of Western and military subjects for many of the widely circulated magazines of the late 1880s and 1890s including Harper’s Weekly, Harper’s Monthly, Century, Collier’s, Outing, Boys’ Life, and Cosmopolitan. Although highly associated with the American West, Remington spent most of his life on the east and resided in New Rochelle, New York. Born in Canton, New York, in 1861, Remington briefly attended the School of Fine Arts at Yale before traveling in the west, then beginning work as an illustrator. As a young man, he traveled widely, sketching the people and places of the new American frontier. By the mid-1880s, Remington became one of the most popular and successful illustrators of the age. Remington also found success as a writer, painter, and sculptor. In Remington’s forty-eight years, he produced over 3,000-signed paintings and drawings, 22 bronze sculptures, and wrote articles and novels that comprised eight books.

The exhibition, Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum, was curated and organized by Laura T. Foster of The Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg, NY.

Fenimore’s presentation of Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum has been sponsored in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

About the Frederic Remington Art Museum
Founded by the estate of Frederic Remington's widow, Eva, the museum has been open since 1923. Open year-round, the museum exhibits Remington masterpieces in oil, many bronze sculptures, scores of works on paper, and many of the artist's working tools and the sketches and photographs that were his inspiration. Fittingly, the museum enjoys a view of the St. Lawrence River, near Canton where he was born and buried, and near the northern woods and waters that were Remington's other frontier. The museum's latest expansion brings Kid's Place, offering classes and
interactive exhibits for kids and their families. The museum is 2.5 hours north of Syracuse and online at www.fredericremington.org

About the Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

###

For more information and images, please contact:
Christine Liggio, Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum/ New York State Historical Association
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
May 2007
Site: 

Evening Lecture Series Set to Begin at the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers' Museum

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COOPERSTOWN,N.Y., April 27, 2007— Fenimore Art Museum, in conjunction with its sister institution The Farmers’ Museum, is pleased to present a series of five evening lectures highlighting the 2007 exhibition season by scholars, critical commentators and authors, from May 5 through August 22. The lectures will be held from 7 to 9 pm in either Fenimore Art Museum or The Farmers’ Museum.

Saturday, May 5: Environmental Landscape Photography in the 1970s
Fenimore Art Museum

Ansel Adams: The Man Who Captured the Earth’s Beauty, a nationally touring exhibition featuring over two-dozen dramatic black and white landscape photographs by renowned 20th century photographer Ansel Adams, will be on view through May 13 at Fenimore Art Museum. In conjunction with this exhibition, the Museum is pleased to bring Kim Sichel, Boston University Associate Professor of History of Photography and Modern Art, for an evening talk on the environmental legacy of Ansel Adams as represented in the work of later generations of western landscape chroniclers such as Robert Adams, Richard Misrach, Frank Gohlke and John Pfahl.

Sichel has been teaching at Boston University since 1987. A scholar of photographic history and European modernism, she served as Chair of the Art History Department from 2002-2005, as Director of Museum studies, and as Director of the Boston University Art Gallery from 1992 to 1998. A specialist in the history of photography, she is the author of Germaine Krull/Monte Carlo (Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 2006), and Evelyn Hofer (Steidl, 2004). She has also authored Germaine Krull: Photographer of Modernity, 1999, published in English by MIT Press and in German by Schirmer/Mosel Verlag. This book was a finalist for the Kraszna-Kraus Foundation awards for best photographic history book of 1999, and won an award for best photography monograph for 1999 from the Maine Photographic Workshops. In addition, she has published numerous articles, book chapters, and exhibition catalogues in Europe and the United States.

Saturday, May 26: Myth and Reality: The Art of the Great Plains
Fenimore Art Museum

Myth and Reality: The Art of the Great Plains was guest curated by Joe D. Horse Capture, Associate Curator, Africa, Oceania and the Americas, Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

In this presentation, Horse Capture will discuss this exhibition, which features more than 25 narrative artworks by Plains Indian artists chronicling 19th-century life and culture on the Great Plains. Drawn from Fenimore’s Thaw Collection and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, these artworks tell the stories of the Plains Indians and unravel some of the myths surrounding the Great Plains.

Saturday, June 9: Behind-the-Scenes with Frederic Remington
Fenimore Art Museum

Laura T. Foster, Curator of the Frederic Remington Art Museum, will talk on Fenimore’s principal season exhibition, Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum, a stunning exhibition showcasing 20 original paintings and drawings, and four original sculptures by famed western painter and illustrator Frederic Remington (1861-1909). Culled from one of the finest Remington collections in the world, The Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg, New York, Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum, showcases not only the breadth of the artist’s work, but also the extensive Remington holdings of the art museum. The lecture will include stories about Remington's artistic process, his life in New York State and his adventures in the west and beyond.

Laura Foster has been curator at the Frederic Remington Art Museum for nearly eighteen years. She has a BA in Art History from the College of Wooster.

Wednesday, July 18: New York City’s Volunteer Fire Department: Folk Art and Fires
Fenimore Art Museum

In this presentation, John Jay College Fire Science Professor Glenn Corbett takes us on a journey to 19th century New York City, exploring its flamboyant firemen and the famous fires that they fought. Corbett describes the firefighters’ elaborate equipment and highlights the landmark blazes that changed the landscape of Manhattan.

Glenn Corbett is an Assistant Professor of Fire Science at John Jay College of Criminal Justice as well as an Assistant Chief of the Waldwick Fire Department in New Jersey. He serves as Technical Editor of Fire Engineering, a 128-year-old fire service journal.

Wednesday, August 8 and 15: French and English Gardens—Part I & II
Fenimore Art Museum

The Fenimore Art Museum welcomes back Dr. Christopher Tadgell, internationally recognized historian on architecture and gardens, for a two-part lecture on French and English gardens. This two-part lecture will be held from 6 to 8 pm.

Dr. Tadgell is a graduate of the Courtauld Institute of Art in London. Most of his career has been spent as Senior Lecturer in Architectural History at the School of Architecture, Canterbury College, Kent Institute of Art and Design. He has lectured widely throughout Britain and the United States, including Harvard University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Princeton University, and Brown University, among others. In 1985 he was Morgan Professor of Architectural Design at the University of Louisville, Kentucky. Since 1987 he has been a member of the Institute of Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ.

Wednesday, August 22: Ice Cream: Our Cool Obsession
The Farmers’ Museum

In conjunction with Ice Cream: Our Cool Obsession, The Farmers’ Museum’s major new exhibition on the history of ice cream, we are pleased to bring award-winning Canadian author Marilyn Powell, for a talk on her new book, Ice Cream: The Delicious History.  This lecture will be held at The Farmers’ Museum.

Ideal for ice cream connoisseurs, Powell’s new book weaves together food history and personal anecdotes to reveal the fact and fiction surrounding ice cream’s history, from ice harvesting and gelato to the origins of the sundae and the ice cream soda.

Powell is an award-winning writer, broadcaster, and producer, and is best known for her work on CBC Radio's acclaimed documentary program Ideas. Among many other programs, she has hosted and produced a national weekly book hour for the CBC Radio’s Stereo Morning. She is a frequent contributor to the book pages of Toronto’s Globe and Mail. Her articles, essays and reviews have appeared in Saturday Night, The Canadian Forum, Arts Manitoba, and Books in Canada. Her short stories have been published in Toronto Short Stories (1978) and Aurora III (1980).

Powell has received numerous honors including two Gabriel Awards for Excellence and Creativity in Radio, two Armstrong Awards (from the U.S. National Radio Broadcasters’ Association), a national award for Best Radio Program of the Year, and a B’nai Brith League of Human Rights award for the radio series “Art and the Holocaust.”

About the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers' Museum
Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum, two distinct institutions that together explore and present the diverse history, art, and culture of rural American life, are located across from each other on Lake Road, Route 80, in Cooperstown, NY. Admission to each museum is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include both museums and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. Fenimore Art Museum is open from April 1 through December 30; The Farmers’ Museum is open from April 1 through October 31, with special events throughout the year. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org and www.farmersmuseum.org.

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For more information or images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
New York State Historical Association
Fenimore Art Museum/The Farmers’ Museum
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: cliggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
April 2007
Site: 

Discovering Art and Nature—Art Classes for Kids Offered at the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers' Museum

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y.June 20, 2007—The Farmers’ Museum and the Fenimore Art Museum team up to offer a perfect blend of summer fun and creative exploration for children ages 4 to 14, from July 2 through August 24, in Discovering Art & Nature: Summer Art Classes for Kids. New this year will be Native American-themed workshops, which will be held at The Farmers’ Museum. There will be two sessions offered daily: 9:00 am to 10:00 am for ages 4-7 and 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm for ages 8-14. Classes will be held Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday at The Farmers’ Museum and Monday and Thursday at the Fenimore Art Museum. No class will be held on July 4th.

The complete class schedule is as follows:

Monday, July 2 (Fenimore Art Museum): Make a Story Book
Young artists will illustrate a story, such as a fairy tale or a story they have written themselves, and will then put these pages together in a book. They will be shown different methods for binding their books, and will have an opportunity to make extra books for photos, journals, or gifts!

Tuesday, July 3 (The Farmers’ Museum): Trees, Trees, and More Trees
Trees are such a big part of our everyday life, yet most of us know little about them. Get a close-up look at trees by studying their different parts, making bark and leaf rubbings, and playing some fun tree-based activities.

Thursday, July 5 (Fenimore Art Museum): Fire and Folk Art
Children will be given a tour of the special exhibit on firefighting, Folk Art on Fire, and will then make and design their own parade fire hats like those seen in the gallery.

Friday, July 6 (The Farmers’ Museum): Animal Sculpture from Clay
Children will be provided clay to create an animal. A walk to the farm and photos of animals will give reference for the children to consider when they make their own unique animals.

Monday, July 9 (Fenimore Art Museum): Egyptian Art
Children will learn some symbols in the ancient Egyptian language of hieroglyphics, as well as some stories of the gods and goddesses of this mystical time. They will then create their own “wall” of hieroglyphics using rubbers stamps, cutout characters, and more!

Tuesday, July 10 (The Farmers’ Museum): Ink Drawing with Twigs
There will be examples of ink drawings done with twigs. The children will go outside in a group to gather several twigs. There will be practice time to get used to drawing with twigs, and then the artists will produce a final drawing.

Wednesday, July 11 (Native American Programs –The Farmers’ Museum): Year of the Turtle
Children will discover the importance of the turtle in the Iroquois culture. Learn how Native Americans kept track of the months through interactive games and stories. Children will create their own turtle calendar.

Thursday, July 12 (Fenimore Art Museum): Sun Prints
Learn about how the art of photography works by making prints on special paper that is exposed in the sun (or if it’s a cloudy day, in a special light box) and is developed in water! They will also make special frames for their favorite prints.

Friday, July 13 (The Farmers’ Museum): Rock Painting
Young artists will paint on smooth river stones to create a “pet rock.” They will then create an environment for their new pet using a small box and collage materials.

Monday, July 16 (Fenimore Art Museum): Collage Constructed with Nature
In this fun class, children will gather twigs, grass, leaves, etc. from outside (if poor weather these items will be pre-collected). These bits from nature will then be cut, sorted, and glued to paper to create a design, landscape, or even a portrait!

Tuesday, July 17 (The Farmers’ Museum): Natural Rhythm
Have you ever taken the time to sit in the woods and listen to all the wonderful sounds? Join us while we listen to the sounds that nature makes. Afterwards, we will make some sound makers of our own.

Wednesday, July 18 (Native American Programs – The Farmers’ Museum): Amazing Maize
Discover some of the many uses for corn. Hear the story of the No Face Doll and make your own cornhusk doll to take home.

Thursday, July 19 (Fenimore Art Museum): Origami-Rama
Young artists will explore the ancient Japanese art of paper folding by learning some basic folds and then making a selection of animals and objects – cats, birds, and even drinking cups – with brightly colored origami paper.

Friday, July 20 (The Farmers’ Museum): Caterpillars and Butterflies
Learn about caterpillars and butterflies. What do caterpillars and butterflies look like up close? Do all caterpillars become butterflies? What do butterflies eat? Learn the answers to these questions and more. Children will also get the chance to make a caterpillar and butterfly to take home.

Monday, July 23 (Fenimore Art Museum): The Mysteries of Paint
In this messy and fun class, children will explore the qualities of different kinds of paint in a series of fun art projects. Children in the afternoon class will make their own egg tempera paints and then create a painting with them!

Tuesday, July 24 (The Farmers’ Museum): A Craving for Carving! With Ron Riley
If you like to carve wood, or have always wanted to see how it's done, join us as we host Ron Riley, a great woodcarver. Ron will be bringing all sorts of wooden items for us to sand and paint.

Wednesday, July 25 (Native American Programs): Oral Tradition
Children will learn about the importance of stories and the oral tradition to the Haudenosaunee. Experience this tradition first hand by listening and then joining in the storytelling themselves. Children will also make a storytelling bag to hold their own stories.

Thursday, July 26 (Fenimore Art Museum): Moving Pictures
Children will explore 19th-century toys used to create “moving pictures,” including thaumatropes and praxinoscopes, and will make their own flip books and other visually exciting toys to take home.

Friday, July 27 (The Farmers’ Museum): “Birds of a Feather…”
Have you ever wanted to learn more about the birds in your back yard? Take a hike on our trails and learn how to listen for different bird calls. Later, we’ll make our very own bird feeders to take home.

Monday, July 30 (Fenimore Art Museum): Kan-do-sky
Kandinsky was a Russian artist who was interested in using shapes and colors to create a feeling of music in his paintings. While listening to different kinds of music, young artists will create their own artworks that relate to the sounds they hear.

Tuesday, July 31 (The Farmers’ Museum): The Plants in Your Forest
Take a walk in the woods and learn about the different plants around us and how they interact with one another. Afterwards each child will make their own terrarium to take home and care for.

Wednesday, August 1 (Native American Programs): Which Animal are You?
Learn about the clan system of the Iroquois. Discover which nine animals make up the clans and the characteristics associated with each. Join in a clan game and make your own clan animal out of clay.

Thursday, August 2 (Fenimore Art Museum): Wild Wild West
Children will explore the art museum’s special exhibit of Frederic Remington’s paintings, drawings, and sculptures of the Old West. They will then create their own artworks based on what they have seen in the gallery.

Friday, August 3 (The Farmers’ Museum): Fabulous Froggy Fun
Take a hike with us to look for different frogs. Children will learn about frogs and their importance in the natural world. We will also make frog puppets to take home.

Monday, August 6 (Fenimore Art Museum): Hudson River School Painting
Young artists will learn about the Hudson River School artists, who made beautiful landscape paintings during the 1800s. They will then make their own large-scale paintings in this style while sitting outside and looking at Otsego Lake (weather permitting).

Tuesday, August 7 (The Farmers’ Museum): Welcome to the Underworld
Most people are so afraid of creepy crawlies that they don’t take the time to see how very cool they are. Join us on a walk in the woods while we search for creatures that live under logs and stones, collect spider webs, and make bug magnets to take home.

Wednesday, August 8 (Native American Programs): Feel the Rhythm
Children will listen to both traditional and modern Native American music. They will discover what instruments were used by the Haudenosaunee and make their own rattle.

Thursday, August 9 (Fenimore Art Museum): Fabulous Fresco Plaque
A fresco is a painting on fresh, wet plaster on a wall or ceiling. The paint is absorbed into the drying plaster, making it permanent. This type of painting has been done since 1600 B.C.! Children will make their own fresco plaques to hang on a wall.

Friday, August 10 (The Farmers’ Museum): Footprint Fun
Animals often leave their footprints in soft mud and sand. Learning to identify these footprints is a fun way to learn about the animals around you. Children will be looking for different types of footprints and learn how to make plaster casts of them.

Monday, August 13 (Fenimore Art Museum): Magnificent Mosaic
Mosaics appeared as early as 3000 B.C. and became widespread during 300 B.C. in cities ruled by Greece. In this class, young artists will design an original mosaic using glass and ceramic tiles.

Tuesday, August 14 (The Farmers’ Museum): Mammal Mania
Children will learn about the mammals they see everyday in their backyard. Join us in some great animal-based activities and make a sock puppet of your favorite mammal.

Wednesday, August 15 (Native American Programs): Fun in the Sun
Games are a part of the Iroquois way of life. Children will learn the history of these games and have the opportunity to try some of them first hand. They will also make their own bowl game to take home.

Thursday, August 16 (Fenimore Art Museum): Play with Clay
Children will look at clay objects in the Thaw Collection of American Indian Art, especially ceramic pots from the Desert Southwest. They will then make their own miniature clay jars using techniques and designs seen in the pieces in the collection.

Friday, August 17 (The Farmers’ Museum): Leaf it to Me
Have you every taken the time to look at all the different leaves there are in our forests?! They come in so many shapes, sizes, and colors. We’ll look at all kinds of leaves, make leaf rubbings, and design leaf print T-shirts to take home.

Monday, August 20 (Fenimore Art Museum): Japanese Painting & Printing
Learn about the arts of ink painting and woodcut printing in this class! Children will look at examples of Japanese paintings and prints, and will make their own based on these styles. They will use special foam blocks to make woodcut-style prints to take home!

Tuesday, August 21 (The Farmers’ Museum): Pressed Flower Art
Did you know you can make a beautiful butterfly or any artistic image with pressed flowers and leaves? Children will be given an array of pressed plant material to make any kind of shape, scene, or image they desire.

Wednesday, August 22 (Native American Programs): Meet the Three Sisters
Find out who the Three Sisters are and their importance in the Haudenosaunee family. Discover how they worked together and were used through hands-on activities and then create a picture using the Three Sisters themselves.

Thursday, August 23 (Fenimore Art Museum): Let’s Go Fly a Kite!
Construct, decorate, and fly your own kite in this fun workshop! Children will choose colors, create tails, and if the weather is good, we will go outside and watch our creations soar into the sky! Limited supplies; please call to reserve for this class!

Friday, August 24 (The Farmers’ Museum): Lake Ecology
Learn about our lake. How did it get here? What life lives beneath its surface? Participants will take a look for life in the lake. Afterwards, make your own underwater scene.

The cost for Discovering Art is $7.00 per child, per class for ages 8-14 and $5.00 per child per class for ages 4-7. Students, who pre-register for four classes, will receive the fifth class free. Reservations are strongly suggested; for more information or to pre-register, please call (607) 547-1410 or visit us online at www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

The Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum, two distinct institutions that together explore and present the diverse history, art, and culture of rural American life, are located across from each other on Lake Road, Route 80, in Cooperstown, NY. Admission to each museum is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include both museums and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The Fenimore Art Museum is open from April 1 through December 30; The Farmers’ Museum is open from April 1 through October 31, with special events throughout the year. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org and www.farmersmuseum.org.

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For more information or images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
New York State Historical Association
Fenimore Art Museum/The Farmers’ Museum
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: cliggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
June 2007

Book Lecture Series to Begin at The Fenimore Art Museum July 1

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COOPERSTOWN, NY, JUNE 28, 2007—The Fenimore Art Museum is pleased to present a Book Lecture Series featuring local and regional authors every Sunday in July and August. The lectures are free and open to the general public and members of the New York State Historical Association. The lectures begin at 2:00 pm and will be held in the auditorium at the Fenimore Art Museum. There will not be a lecture on Sunday, July 29.

July 1: James Greiner, Subdued by the Sword: A Line Office in the 121st New York Volunteers
Subdued by the Sword presents the personal story of Captain John Swain Kidder, a wagon-maker from Laurens, NY, who epitomized the citizen-soldier of the Civil War era. Drawing on previously unpublished letters written by Kidder to his wife, Harriet, during the Civil War, James M. Greiner recounts the triumphs and tragedies endured by one New York family.

July 8: Sheila Kohler, Bluebird, or the Invention of Happiness
Sheila Kohler’s historical fictional novel, Bluebird, or the Invention of Happiness, is based on the life of Lucy Dillion, a charming and beautiful, but also practical and determined 18th-century French aristocrat. Lucy manages to save herself and her family from the terror that followed the French Revolution, and later settles in New York’s Hudson Valley, where she remakes herself into the hardworking proprietress of a successful dairy farm.

July 15: Russell Dunn, A Guide to the Waterfalls of the Mohawk Valley, Schoharie Valley, Helderbergs, and along Route 20
Russell Dunn is the author of five guidebooks to the natural wonders of New York State, including an ongoing series of waterfall guidebooks and a guidebook (co-written with Barbara Delaney) to hiking trails that lead to historic sites. One of the hallmarks that distinguish all of Mr. Dunn's books is his inclusion of any available historical information associated with the natural sites he explores. Dunn will talk on his most recent release, A Guide to the Waterfalls of the Mohawk Valley, Schoharie Valley, Helderbergs, and along Route 20, as well as Trails with Tales: History Hike’s through the Capital Region, Saratoga, Berkshires, Catskills & Hudson Valley.

July 22: Jim Heron, Denning’s Point, A Hudson River Story: From 4000BC to the 21st Century
Heron is project historian for The Beacon Institute for Rivers & Estuaries, and his book grew out of his research into the surprisingly rich history of the 64-acre peninsula off the shore of Beacon, New York, that is now home to the Beacon Institute. This small plot of land encapsulates the history of the Hudson River Valley--from prehistoric Native Americans, to colonial settlement, the Revolutionary War, the rise of the great estates, the coming of the railroads, the brick industry, land abuse and pollution, and finally, conservation and revitalization. Much of Heron's book is the fruit of original research, including his discoveries of definitive proof that prehistoric Native Americans lived on Denning's Point, and that Alexander Hamilton lived there briefly during the Revolution, and while there first set down on paper his thoughts on the political and financial structure of the new nation. Indeed, Heron makes a strong case for the "birth" of the U.S. Constitution as taking place on this little and little-known piece of real estate jutting into the Hudson River between Beacon and Newburgh.

August 5: Jim Atwell, From Fly Creek: Celebrating Life in Leatherstocking County
Fly Creek resident and author Jim Atwell will present a talk on his book, From Fly Creek: Celebrating Life in Leatherstocking County, which features a collection of his newspaper columns.

August 12: Mark Simonson, Reminiscing Across the Valleys and Oneonta: Then and Now
Oneonta city historian and Daily Star columnist Mark Simonson will present a in-depth look at local history through his publications, Reminiscing Across the Valleys and Oneonta: Then and Now. Reminiscing Across the Valleys presents a collection of brief articles about the people, places and events that helped shape the Southern tier of New York State. In Oneonta: Then and Now, Simonson assembled a pictorial history highlighting the old and new Oneonta.

August 19: Jane Dieffenbacher, Herkimer County: Valley Towns
Herkimer County resident, author and historian Jane Dieffenbacher will present a lecture on her book Herkimer County: Valley Towns. Dieffenbacher’s book covers the development of the Central Mohawk Valley and includes the villages of Herkimer, Little Falls, Dolgeville, Mohawk, Ilion, and Frankfort. Dieffenbacher’s talk will discuss the Native American residents, the Palatine settlers, and the New Englanders who came following the Revolutionary War.

August 26: Dennis Webster, Daisy Daring & the Quest for the Loomis Gang Gold
Mohawk Valley author Dennis Webster will talk on his exciting read, Daisy Daring & the Quest for the Loomis Gang Gold. This engaging mystery will spark the readers’ curiosity about Daisy Daring and the historical famed Loomis Gang, who were quite powerful during 19th-century America.

The lectures are free and open to the general public and members of the New York State Historical Association. The lectures will be held in the Fenimore Art Museum auditorium beginning at 2:00 pm. For more information, please call (607) 547-1400 or visit us online at www.fenimoreartmuseum.org

About Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

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For more information or images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
New York State Historical Association
Fenimore Art Museum/The Farmers’ Museum
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: cliggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
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