Fenimore

Fenimore Art Museum

Kids’ Winter Workshops Offered at the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y., FEBRUARY 6, 2008—The Farmers’ Museum and the Fenimore Art Museum will once again offer the popular Fabulous February Fun: Kids’ Winter Workshops on February 19, 20, and 21 from 9:30 am to noon. This year’s programming offers fun and exciting activities incorporating aspects of both museums and Native American culture. The workshop schedule follows:

Tuesday, Feb. 19 – Fenimore Art Museum
Participants will design their own fantasy maps, and create paintings at the Fenimore Art Museum.

Wednesday, Feb. 20 – Native American Programs
Children will play traditional games, listen to stories, and make Native American crafts.

Thursday, Feb. 21– The Farmers’ Museum
Join us for some old-fashioned games and crafts that are sure to warm you up.

The workshops will be held at the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum from 9:30 am – 12 pm. The workshops are open to children 7-11. Admission: $15 per workshop or $40 for all three days. All classes will meet at the Main Barn of The Farmers’ Museum. Pre-registration is strongly recommended, walk-ins welcome. Call (607) 547-1410 for registration and information.

The Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum, two distinct institutions that together explore and present the diverse history, art, and culture of rural American life, are located across from each other on Lake Road, Route 80, in Cooperstown, NY. Admission to each museum is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include both museums and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The Fenimore Art Museum is open from April 1 through December 31; The Farmers’ Museum is open from April 1 through October 31, with special events throughout the year. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org and www.farmersmuseum.org.

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For more information and photographs, please contact:
Christine Liggio, Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum & The Farmers’ Museum
P.O. Box 800, Cooperstown, NY 13326
Tel: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
February 2008
Site: 

Fenimore Art Museum Announces 2008 Exhibitions

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Gilded Lions and Jeweled Horses: The Synagogue to the Carousel
May 24 – September 1, 2008

From gilded lions to high-stepping horses, the sacred to the secular, and the Old World to the New, this exhibition traces, for the first time, the journey of Jewish woodcarvers and paper cut artists from Eastern and Central Europe to America. Gilded Lions and Jeweled Horses: The Synagogue to the Carousel, organized by the American Folk Art Museum, New York, highlights the unsung role these artisans played in establishing a distinct Jewish culture in communities throughout the United States and provides a surprising revelation of the link that was forged between the immigrant Jewish woodcarvers and the American carousel industry. The exhibition brings together extraordinary examples of majestic synagogue carvings—gilded lions, Decalogues, crowns and eagles as well as intricate paper cuts—juxtaposed against dynamic carousel figures created for Brooklyn’s great amusement park, Coney Island, and others. Featuring 100 rarely exhibited artworks, drawn from private and public collections in the United States, Eastern Europe and Israel, the exhibition tells the story of this fascinating aspect of Jewish and American visual culture.

Organized by Guest Curator Murray Zimiles and coordinated by the American Folk Art Museum’s Senior Curator Stacy C. Hollander, the exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated 192-page book, Gilded Lions And Jeweled Horses: The Synagogue to the Carousel, co-published by the American Folk Art Museum with Brandeis University Press, an imprint of the University Press of New England. In addition, please visit the exhibition website at gildedlions.org, which was conceptualized by George Blumenthal and funded by The Center for Online Judaic Studies, Inc.

Major support for the exhibition and catalogue was provided by Michael Steinhardt; Kekst and Company; the David Berg Foundation; the Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation; the Smart Family Foundation; the Philip and Muriel Berman Foundation, Allentown, Pennsylvania; the Betty and John A. Levin Fund; the Robert Lehman Foundation; the Nathan Cummings Foundation; the National Endowment for the Arts; the New York State Council on the Arts; and the New York Council for the Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Gustav Stickley: The Enlightened Home
April 1- August 10, 2008

The Fenimore Art Museum presents an exhibition on the furniture of celebrated turn-of-the-century designer and manufacturer and leading spokesman for the American Arts and Crafts Movement, Gustav Stickley. Gustav Stickley: The Enlightened Home features 40 pieces of original Stickley furniture and decorative objects drawn from The Stickley Museum, Fayetteville, N.Y.; Dalton’s American Decorative Arts, Syracuse, N.Y.; The Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms, Morris Plains, N.J. and private collections.

The exhibition explores Stickley’s well-designed and carefully crafted furniture within the context of his philosophical contribution to the American Arts and Crafts movement. Inspired by the ideas of British Arts and Crafts philosopher William Morris, who advocated a return to fine craftsmanship, honest design, and dignity of labor, Stickley generated his own “Craftsman” philosophy, which catapulted him to the forefront of the American Arts and Crafts movement. Rejecting the superfluous ornamentation characteristic of Victorian homes, Stickley championed functional homes whose beauty derived from simplicity and harmony.

Gustav Stickley: The Enlightened Home, which includes two period rooms, a 1904 living room and a 1907 dining room, highlights several pieces from Stickley’s rich body of work and illustrates how Stickley redefined the American home with his Arts and Crafts-inspired items. Stickley’s philosophy of building in harmony with the environment by using natural materials was fully realized in his home, Craftsman Farms in Morris Plains, New Jersey. His functional approach to design was a departure from the Victorian era’s dark and overly ornamental interiors. Stickley’s unornamented, clean-lined furniture was exemplified throughout the interior and exterior design of his home. While individual pieces of furniture used construction as decoration, embodied simplicity, and prioritized utility, these tenets were also implemented on a much grander scale within the home.

Rural Icons: Photographs by Richard Walker
April 1 – May 11, 2008

This exhibition features nearly 100 compelling portraits, still-lifes and landscapes of rural upstate New York by local photographer Richard Walker. The exhibition presents the region’s physical beauty, enhanced by its architecture, people and material culture in the context of a declining agricultural landscape and its architectural legacy.

Richard Walker is a commercial photographer of objects, antiques, sculpture, paintings, architecture and interiors, and people with their art and collections. He is especially known for his still-life compositions of products, antiques and collectibles, sports memorabilia, and historical ephemera.

Bits of Home
April 1 – December 31

Bits of Home juxtaposes disparate objects around the theme of home. Featuring more than 40 rarely seen artifacts drawn from the museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition offers insight into ordinary domestic objects.

Through the Eyes of Others: African Americans and Identity in American Art
August 23– December 31, 2008

The images of African Americans at the Fenimore Art Museum offer insights into the ways that Americans in the past viewed one another; how artistic representations of black people created and reinforced popular attitudes; and how these attitudes continue to affect us today. This is not simply a story for African Americans, but for all of us, because the issues represented in this exhibition— identity, self-portrayal, survival, resistance, and stereotyping—are issues that relate to each individual who has ever wondered about their own identity and to every group that has entered this country.

This exhibition is curated by Gretchen Sullivan Sorin, Director of The Cooperstown Graduate Program and has been made possible by a generous grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency.

Earl Cunningham’s America
September 27 – December 31, 2008

Earl Cunningham’s America examines the paintings of Earl Cunningham (1893-1977), one of the premier folk artists of the 20th century. This retrospective presents the artist as a folk modernist who used the flat space and brilliant color typical of Matisse and Van Gogh to create sophisticated compositions with complex meanings about the nature of American life. The exhibition features 50 of more than 400 canvasses Cunningham painted during his life. His imaginary landscapes are marvels of the unexpected and the unlikely. Pink flamingoes dot the shoreline of the Maine coast, New England cottages sit at the edge of Florida swamps and Seminole Indians wear feathered headdresses.

Earl Cunningham’s America is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The exhibition will travel to the American Folk Art Museum in New York City (March 4, 2008 – August 31, 2008) and the Mennello Museum of American Art in Orlando, Fla. (March 6, 2009 – August 2, 2009).

The exhibition is made possible by generous support from Darden Restaurants Foundation; the Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation; the Arts and Cultural Affairs Office of Orange County, Florida; CNL Financial Group; Bright House Networks; Lockheed Martin; and Friends of The Mennello Museum of American Art. The exhibition’s tour is supported in part by the C. F. Foundation, Atlanta.

Remembering Cooperstown: Photographs by Smith and Telfer
April 1 – May 11 & September 20 – December 31

This exhibition, culled from the museum’s permanent collection, features familiar and rarely seen photographs drawn from the Smith and Telfer Photographic Collection. The spring and fall exhibits will each feature a different selection of photography showcasing the breadth of the collection. Cooperstown photographers ‘Wash” Smith and “Putt” Telfer compiled an exceptional record of Cooperstown’s people and places for almost a century. The Smith and Telfer Photograph Collection, donated to the museum in 1951, numbers nearly 55,000 glass plate negatives. Smith and Telfer’s legacy is rich, and includes not only standard studio work, but also a vast number of images of people and activities recorded outside of the studio. Their familiarity with Cooperstown’s people and places gave their images a natural, unposed quality, which captures the spirit and sensibility of small town life. Through their lens Cooperstown is remembered as the quintessential American rural village.

(Please confirm exhibitions, titles, and dates)

Ongoing Exhibitions (April 1 – December 31, 2008)

American Memory: Recalling the Past in Folk Art—Selections of folk art from the permanent collection.

The Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection of American Indian Art—Selections from this comprehensive collection of Native American art from pre-contact times to present day.

The Coopers of Cooperstown—Memorabilia and paintings associated with American novelist, James Fenimore Cooper.

American Fine Art from the Permanent Collection—featuring 18th- and 19th-century landscapes, genre paintings, and portraits that represent the history and culture of New York State.

About the Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 31; closed January through March, except for special events and school groups. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

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For more information and images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum/New York State Historical Association
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
February 2008
Site: 

Fenimore Art Museum Offers Virtual Vacations in January and February

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y.—On select Saturdays in January and February, the Fenimore Art Museum will offer a series of distance learning field trips to distant locales featuring intriguing subjects, such as Butterflies, Rain Forest Birds, and Sea Life. These exciting programs, created by the Center for Puppetry Arts, the Cincinnati Museum Center, and the Mariner’s Museum, use the Fenimore Art Museum’s videoconferencing technology to bring a unique, interactive experience for children ages 5 through 12. After each lesson, museum educators will work with participants on a hands-on activity based on the theme of the virtual visit. The programs will be held on January 19 & 26 for ages 5-8 and February 2 & 9 for ages 9-12. All programs are held from 10 – 11:30 am.

January 19: Butterflies
Ages 5-8

Each student will construct a Butterfly Marionette while participating in learning activities about the lifecycle of the butterfly, what makes a butterfly an insect, and coloring and camouflage. Video clips and photographs of the different stages in the life of a butterfly are included.

January 26: Walk in my Shoes: Paleontologist
Ages 5-8

How does a paleontologist do her job? What tools are required to examine rocks that are millions of years old? And, what do fossils tell us about life 65 million years ago? This program examines these questions and more, allowing participants to see the life of a scientist.

February 2: Rain Forest Birds
Ages 9-12

Students will construct a flying Tropical Bird Rod puppet. They will participate in learning activities about the location of tropical rain forests and their relationship to the equator and tropic lines, various animals found in the rain forest and the different layers in the rain forest.

February 9: Life at Sea
Ages 9-12

This exciting program literally opens a sailor’s sea chest and allows students to investigate items that would have been carried and used by a typical 19th-century sailor. Students will discover items such as clothing, food, eating utensils, tools, and musical instruments. Students will learn a craft in a hands-on experience that illustrates the daily life of a sailor.

Each workshop costs $15/$12 for members of the New York State Historical Association. For reservations and information, please call (607) 547-1414.

About the Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 31. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

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For more information and photographs, please contact:
Christine Liggio, Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum & The Farmers’ Museum
P.O. Box 800, Cooperstown, NY 13326
Tel: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
January 2008
Site: 

Gustav Stickley: The Enlightened Home

Museum: 
Fenimore

Gustav Stickley (1858-1942) was a furniture maker as well as the leading spokesperson for the American Craftsman movement. Stickley formed the philosophy for his Craftsman furniture after encountering the British Arts & Crafts movement during trips to Europe in the mid-1890s. Before he discovered and began making Arts & Craft-inspired items, Stickley manufactured the mass-produced, ornamental, fad-driven furniture which he later denounced.

start date: 
03/31/2008
end date: 
08/09/2008
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Folding Screen, 1907-1912. Once owned by Barbara Streisand. Collection of The Stickley Museum, L. & J.G. Stickley, Inc.
Caption 2: 
Inlaid Viking Ship Desk, 1902-1903. Probably designed by Harvey Ellis. Private collection.
Meta Tags
Description: 
Gustav Stickley: The Enlightened Home, April 1, 2008 - August 10, 2008, Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, NY

Rural Icons: Photographs by Richard Walker

Museum: 
Fenimore

"Rural upstate New York is a region of compelling physical beauty enhanced by its architecture, people and material culture. As a photographer, I feel very fortunate to have the opportunity to explore and record its many riches.

start date: 
03/31/2008
end date: 
05/10/2008
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Abandoned Barn, Dead Elm, 1985, by Richard Walker (Chaseville, NY)
Caption 2: 
Rex Wilsey, 1987, by Richard Walker (Rex Wilsey, 100 years old)
Meta Tags
Description: 
Rural Icons: Photographs by Richard Walker, April 1, 2008 - May 11, 2008, Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, NY

Earl Cunningham's America

Museum: 
Fenimore

Earl Cunningham's America examines paintings from Earl Cunningham's  entire career from 1926 to 1977. Cunningham (1893-1977) was one of the premier American folk artists of the 20th century. This retrospective presents the artist as a folk modernist who used flat space and brilliant color to create sophisticated compositions with complex meanings about the nature of American life. The exhibition features 50 of the more than 400 works on board that Cunningham painted during his life.

start date: 
09/26/2008
end date: 
12/30/2008
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
New England Autumn (detail), 1928. Collection of Marilyn L. and Michael A. Mennello.
Caption 2: 
Blue Sail Fleet Returns, after 1949. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Mennello.

Fenimore Art Museum to Open 6th Contemporary Iroquois Art Biennial

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y.,SEPTEMBER 14, 2007—The Fenimore Art Museum will open Being Indian: The 6th Contemporary Iroquois Art Biennial, an exhibition featuring the works of Native American artists Peter B. Jones and George Longfish, on September 22. The exhibition showcases Iroquois pottery and vivid mixed-media paintings representing Native identity and the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) experience. The exhibition was developed in collaboration with guest curator G. Peter Jemison, a contemporary Native American (Seneca) artist and leading authority on the history of the Haudenosaunee. The exhibition will be on view through December 30, 2007.

“Peter B. Jones and George Longfish create art based on their experiences as “Indians.” They have set out to describe their lives through their art. Their art is reality-based, and while it may reflect the past, it is very much rooted in the ongoing present,” commented G. Peter Jemison, guest curator.

Peter B. Jones (Onondaga-Seneca) is a renowned potter and sculptor from the Beaver Clan, Onondaga Nation. Jones, who resides on the Cattaraugus Territory of the Seneca Nation of Indians, studied under Hopi artist Otellie Loloma while attending the Institute of American Indian Art in New Mexico. His pottery, which is derived from traditional Iroquois pit firing, hand-built coiling and slab construction, is admired and collected by community members, Native American art collectors, and museums across the country. Reminiscent of early Iroquois pottery, Jones’ art directly reflects the issues that have impacted the Haudenosaunee.

George Longfish (Seneca-Tuscarora) was the director of the University of Montana’s Graduate Program in American Indian Art from 1972-1973 and was Professor of Historical and Contemporary Native Arts at the University of California at Davis from 1973-2003. Through his roles as educator, curator, and artist, Longfish has contributed greatly to increasing the awareness of the contemporary Native American art movement through exhibitions featuring the works of Native American artists from across the country. Longfish is best known for his vivid paintings, which often use humor and irony, to address issues of Native identity. His work has been featured in many solo and group exhibitions including a 2004 exhibition at the Smithsonion’s National Museum of the American Indian.

Guest Curator G. Peter Jemison (Seneca) is the Site Manager for Ganondagan State Historic Site in Victor, New York, the location of a seventeenth-century Seneca town. A member of the Heron Clan of the Seneca Nation, G. Peter Jemison is highly regarded for his paintings, videos, and mixed media works on parasols and brown paper bags. The works draw upon the concept of orenda, the traditional Haudenosaunee (Iroquois Confederacy) belief that every living thing and every part of creation contains a spiritual force. Jemison’s artwork is intrinsically related to his overarching focus on Native American artistic and cultural heritage, which has led him to become a leading authority on the history of the Haudenosaunee, as well as one of the Seneca Nation’s most esteemed curators, writers, administrators, and political representatives.

About Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

###

For more information or images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
New York State Historical Association
Fenimore Art Museum/The Farmers’ Museum
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: cliggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
September 2007
Site: 

The Fenimore Art Museum Receives an Important Collection of Native American Art and Two New Acquisitions

Press Release Contact: 

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y., September 4, 2007—The Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York, has received many notable gifts in recent months including a substantial Native American collection from the Barbar Conable family, a contemporary Native American work from Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw, and a historic musical instrument and landscape painting from Patricia B. Selch in memory of Eric Selch.

The Barbar Conable family’s Native American collection comprises eighty objects including several artifacts of Iroquois origin dating from the early 17th through the 20th century, which provide an excellent opportunity for the Fenimore Art Museum to tell a richer story of life in 18th- and 19th-century New York. Many of the objects will be used in a hands-on capacity in the museum’s Mohawk Bark House, a recreated 18th-century Iroquois hunting and fishing lodge, located on the shore of legendary Otsego Lake, while others will be on view in the museum’s galleries. Of particular note is a beautifully beaded finger woven sash from the late 18th century. This stunning object incorporates white beads, a valued trade item between the European settlers and the Native Americans. The collection also features a richly detailed 1790 carved powder horn, which is an excellent example of early life on the frontier. The Plains Indians are also represented in this collection through many quilled objects, including a hair ornament, moccasins, and a hide tobacco bag.

Barbar Conable (1922-2003) was born in Warsaw, New York, a small town in the northwestern part of the state. It was there that he discovered Indian arrowheads plowed up by local farmers, which piqued his interest in Native American artifacts and formed the genesis for his lifelong passion for collection. Conable served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1965-1985 and was appointed the seventh President of the World Bank Group from 1986-1991.

The Fenimore also received a new acquisition, “When We Were There” (2006), a collage by renowned contemporary Native American artist Arthur Amiotte (Lakota), from Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw for the Thaw Collection of American Indian Art. Amiotte incorporates specific elements of the past into his work, using not only his family’s history, but also Lakota history, putting all in the context of a general, historical past. In this collage, Amiotte illustrates the travels and adventures of his great-grandfather, Standing Bear, and other Lakota peoples throughout Europe with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West traveling shows. Amiotte’s work is widely exhibited and held in many private and public collections throughout the United States. Fenimore’s season exhibition, Myth and Reality: Art of the Great Plains, features a painting depicting the Battle of Little Big Horn by Amiotte’s great-grandfather Standing Bear. “When We Were There” is currently on view in the American Indian Wing.

The Selch Collection is one of the largest private collections of historic American musical materials in the United States, and we are pleased to announce that we received a donation of a reed organ, made by A.L. Swan of Cherry Valley, New York, and patented May 7, 1850, from Patricia B. Selch in memory of Eric Selch. Frederick Selch (1930-2002) is best known as a preeminent authority on American musical instruments and musical culture and his prolific collection of musical instruments, manuscripts, books and works of art relating to American musical culture. Before being acquired by the Selches, the melodeon was in the Deansboro Musical Museum, a private collection that was open to the public for many years. It was dispersed by auction in the late 1990s.

The Selches have also given a painting, Windham Valley in the Catskills, A Tollgate on the Susquehanna Turnpike, by Henry A. Duessell, ca. 1893. This painting depicts Windham, New York during the 19th century and includes an iron bridge, residential dwellings, and the ‘Old Bump Tavern,’ shown in its original location, which is now in The Farmers’ Museum’s historic village. Also visible in the painting is a tollbooth and sawmill, relating to an earlier use of the turnpike as a plank road. The painting is on view at the entryway into the Main Gallery on the first floor of the museum.

About Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

Press Release Category: 
Recent Announcements
Publication Date: 
September 2007
Site: 

Frederic Remington Exhibition Soon to Close at the Fenimore Art Museum

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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y., August 28, 2007—If you haven’t seen the exhibition Treasures from the Frederic Remington Museum at the Fenimore Art Museum yet, this is your last chance.

Closing Tuesday, September 4, 2007, the exhibition features more than 20 original paintings and drawings and four original sculptures by famed western painter and illustrator Frederic Remington (1861-1909). Culled from one of the finest Remington collections in the world, The Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg, New York, Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum, showcases not only the breadth of the artist’s work, but also the extensive Remington holdings of the art museum.

The exhibition showcases the artist’s best-known and significant works, including an 1885 watercolor, Sunday Morning Toilet on the Ranch, which is a fine example of Remington’s early devotion to the theme of cowboy ritual and camaraderie. Remington is also known for his bronzes, of which four original sculptures will be featured in the exhibition, including a fine, early example of The Broncho Buster, 1895.

Regarded as a chronicler of the American West, Frederic Remington was a multitalented artist who made a name for himself as an illustrator of western and military subjects for many of the widely circulated magazines of the late 1880s and 1890s including Harper’s Weekly, Harper’s Monthly, Century, Collier’s, Outing, Boys’ Life, and Cosmopolitan. Although highly associated with the American West, Remington spent most of his life on the east and resided in New Rochelle, New York. Born in Canton, New York, in 1861, Remington briefly attended the School of Fine Arts at Yale before traveling in the west, then beginning work as an illustrator. As a young man, he traveled widely, sketching the people and places of the new American frontier. By the mid-1880s, Remington became one of the most popular and successful illustrators of the age. Remington also found success as a writer, painter, and sculptor. In Remington’s forty-eight years, he produced over 3,000-signed paintings and drawings, 22 bronze sculptures, and wrote articles and novels that comprised eight books.

Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum was curated and organized by Laura T. Foster of The Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg, NY. Fenimore’s presentation of Treasures from the Frederic Remington Art Museum has been sponsored in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

About Fenimore Art Museum
One of the nation’s premier art institutions, the Fenimore Art Museum is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. Founded in 1945 in Cooperstown, New York, the museum is part of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), founded in 1899. The museum’s renowned Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection, housed in the American Indian Wing, is a masterpiece collection of more than 800 art objects, representing a broad scope of North American cultures. The collections of folk and American art include seminal works by Grandma Moses, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, William Sidney Mount, Benjamin West, and John H. I. Browere. The museum offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults, including lectures and workshops for museum visitors and distance learning instruction for classrooms nationwide. The museum further explores and examines our cultural history by organizing and hosting nationally touring art and history exhibitions, including Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation; Treasures from Olana: The Landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church; A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.; Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks; and Ralph Fasanella’s America.

The Fenimore Art Museum is located on 5798 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown. The museum’s Fenimore Café, overlooking beautiful Otsego Lake, features wonderful views and a tranquil setting amid the terraced gardens. The Museum Shop offers fine jewelry, art reproductions, and a wide selection of publications on folk art, history, and Native American art. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and NYSHA members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include The Farmers’ Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open from April 1 through December 30. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org.

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For more information and images, please contact:
Christine Liggio, Public Relations Office
Fenimore Art Museum/ New York State Historical Association
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: c.liggio@nysha.org

Press Release Category: 
Exhibition Press Releases
Publication Date: 
August 2007
Site: 

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