Fenimore

Fenimore Art Museum

Through the Eyes of Others: African-Americans in American Art

The images of African Americans at Fenimore Art Museum offer insights into the ways that Americans in the past viewed one another; how artistic representations of black people created and reinforced popular attitudes; and how these attitudes continue to affect us today. This is not simply a story for African Americans, but for all of us, because the issues represented in this exhibition—identity, self-portrayal, survival, resistance, and stereotyping—are issues that relate to each individual who has ever wondered about their own identity and to every group that has entered this country.

start date: 
01/14/2009
end date: 
01/31/2010
Exhibition Type: 
traveling
Site: 
travel_locations: 

Venue 1

Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, N.Y.

Venues 2-5

OPEN

Images
Caption 1: 
Black Child, ca. 1820. Philip Thomas Cole Tilyard (1787-1827). Gift of Stephen C. Clark. Collection of the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, NY.
Caption 2: 
Kept In, 1889. Edward Lamson Henry (1841-1919). Gift of Stephen C. Clark. Collection of the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, N.Y.

Through the Eyes of Others: African Americans and Identity in American Art

Museum: 
Fenimore

The images of African Americans at the Fenimore Art Museum offer insights into the ways that Americans in the past viewed one another; how artistic representations of black people created and reinforced popular attitudes; and how these attitudes continue to affect us today.

start date: 
08/22/2008
end date: 
12/30/2008
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Black Child, ca. 1820. Philip Thomas Cole Tilyard (1787-1827). Gift of Stephen C. Clark. Collection of the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, NY.
Caption 2: 
The Problem We All Live With (Artist’s Proof), 1964. Rockwell, Norman. Norman Rockwell Museum.

The 6th Contemporary Iroquois Art Biennial Featuring Peter B. Jones and George Longfish

Museum: 
Fenimore

This exhibition will feature ceramic pots by Peter B. Jones and collages by George Longfish. Both are contemporary Iroquois artists.

Guest Curator G. Peter Jemison (Seneca) is the Site Manager for Ganondagan State Historic Site in Victor, New York, the location of a seventeenth-century Seneca town.

start date: 
09/21/2007
end date: 
12/29/2007
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Untitled, 2005. Peter B. Jones. Collection of the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, NY.

Panoramas of Pride: 19th Century Bird's Eye Views of New York State

Museum: 
Fenimore

This selection of New York state bird’s-eye views dates from the 1850s to 1890. During the second half of the 19th century, especially after the Civil War, the most common type of city view was drawn from an imaginary perspective high in the air. Bird’s-eye views appealed to local pride and the desire to promote one’s community. After the Civil War, firms specializing in bird’s-eye views employed itinerant artists to travel the country to make illustrations of large cities and small towns alike.

start date: 
03/31/2007
end date: 
12/29/2007
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Cooperstown, New York, 1862. M. Dev. Martin, artist and lithographer. Lewis & Goodwin, Albany, New York, publishers. Gift of Mrs. Morgan Henry, N0040.1964

Myth & Reality: The Art of the Great Plains

Museum: 
Fenimore

The complex relationship between distinct cultures creates a remarkable dynamic, especially when one culture attempts to make a pictorial record of the other. The exaggerations and inaccuracies of the resultant imagery can have an intense impact on both cultures. For America and most of the world, the Great Plains evokes images of painted tipis, savage buffalo hunts, and warriors on horseback wearing elaborate feather headdresses.

start date: 
03/31/2007
end date: 
12/29/2007
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Horse Mask, ca. 1870. Unidentified Artist, Nez Perce. The Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection of American Indian Art.

Remington Student Guide

This guide was prepared to enhance student visits to Treasures of Frederick Remington.

Remington honed his work with a journalist's sensibility for story-telling in words and pictures, buttressed with a tremendous sense of place. The West he depicted had already vanished, but Frederic Remington snatched it from oblivion and captured the world, the work, and the spirit of the American cowboy, the frontier cavalry soldier, and the determined Native American warrior forever.

Pages: 
4
Lesson Plan Type: 
Exhibits
Site: 

About Face

What did Thomas Jefferson really look like? Find out in this workshop as your class tours the Browere Life Masks exhibit. Learn about important figures of early American history, play a special gallery game, and create a portrait of your own to take home.
NYS Learning Standards Addressed: English Language Arts, the Arts, Social Studies

Pages: 
4
Lesson Plan Type: 
Tour
Grades: 
4-8
Site: 

Pages