Fenimore

Fenimore Art Museum

Dairy Farming: A Growing Industry

Caption 1: 
Document 7

Students develop an awareness and an appreciation for local records and primary source documents related to the dairy industry, and learn how new technology helped the dairy farmer to increase production.

Pages: 
19 total (cover page - 1; teacher guide - 5; student DBQ - 6; primary source documents - 7)
Publication Date: 
June 2000
Site: 

The Late 1800s Farm Family and the Economy in New York State

Caption 1: 
Document 6

Students learn about the typical farm and farm family (Wedderspoon family) in the late 1800s and how they contributed to the local and national economy.

Pages: 
24
Publication Date: 
June 2000
Site: 

Treasures from Olana: Landscapes by Frederic Edwin Church

Museum: 
Fenimore

The paintings selected by Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900) for his home, Olana, are part of the whole that makes Olana unique—an interior carefully orchestrated by the artist to reflect his interests, travels, and aesthetic. Olana is one of the few intact homes of an American artist and the highlight of Olana is the artist's own paintings that he chose to feature. These canvases represent the story of the artist through his own work.

start date: 
06/11/2005
end date: 
09/17/2005
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Sunset, Jamaica, 1865. Courtesy of the Olana Partnership.

Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks

Museum: 
Fenimore

Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks includes thirteen of the artist's greatest works in watercolor and oil, along with twelve wood engravings from popular periodicals. These works represent a broad chronological overview of Homer's interest in the New York wilderness, from the early 1870s to 1902. The Guest Curator for the exhibition is Dr. David Tatham, Professor of Fine Arts, Emeritus, Syracuse University.

start date: 
06/20/2004
end date: 
09/05/2004
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Two Guides, ca. 1875. Collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA.

A Deaf Artist in Early America: The Worlds of John Brewster, Jr.

Museum: 
Fenimore

John Brewster, Jr. (1766-1854) was a deaf portrait painter who created hauntingly beautiful images of American life during the formative period of the nation. Born in rural Connecticut, Brewster helped create a style of American folk portraiture that came to dominate rural New England: a striking adaptation of the English Grand Manner filtered through the works of Connecticut portraitist Ralph Earl.

start date: 
03/31/2005
end date: 
12/30/2005
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
One Shoe Off, 1807. Oil on canvas. Gift of Stephen C. Clark. Collection of the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, NY.

Grandma Moses: Grandmother to the Nation

Museum: 
Fenimore

Developed in thematic sections that connect Moses' work to America's transition from the Great Depression and World War II to prosperity and domesticity in the 1950s, the exhibition incorporates Moses' paintings with photographs, artifacts, and source material for her art.

start date: 
05/26/2006
end date: 
12/30/2006
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Sugaring Off, 1945. Oil on canvas. Gift of Mrs. Stephen Clark. Collection of the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, NY.

Statesmen, Heroes, Soldiers, Spies: Lifemasks of Celebrated Americans

Museum: 
Fenimore

start date: 
01/01/2011
end date: 
12/31/2016
Exhibition Type: 
traveling
Site: 
travel_locations: 

Venues OPEN

Images
Caption 1: 
Bust of Thomas Jefferson, by John H. I. Browere. Third President of the United States, Age 82. Cast October 15, 1825, at Monticello, Virginia. Gift of Stephen C. Clark. Collection of the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, N.Y.

The Flower of Youth: 19th Century Portraits of Children

Museum: 
Fenimore

Attitudes toward childhood changed radically in 19th-century America. Whereas in the 17th century the Puritan conception of the child was of a miniature adult beset by innate evil, societal attitudes gradually underwent a positive evolution. Under the influence of the European Enlightenment and the American Revolution, a new appreciation of childhood emerged and flourished. A belief in the innocence of youth supplanted earlier prejudices, and an interest in child development became a predominant issue of American popular debate.

start date: 
03/31/2006
end date: 
12/30/2006
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Picking Flowers, ca. 1845. Attributed to Samuel Miller (ca. 1870-1853). Gift of Stephen C. Clark. Collection of the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, N.Y.

America's Ancient Past: Art of the Mounds and Canyon People

Museum: 
Fenimore

In the Southwest United States, pottery-making began about two thousand years ago and became a powerful form of expression. Women created a wide range of hand-coiled vessels including serving dishes and storage vessels for water, food, and seeds. Pottery was painted with imagery inspired by the everyday world and the cosmos. Southwest pottery making has remained vibrant to the present day.

start date: 
03/31/2007
end date: 
12/29/2007
Exhibition Type: 
finite
Site: 
Images
Caption 1: 
Sikyatki Bowl, 1450-1500 A.D. Northeastern Arizona. The Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection of American Indian Art.
Caption 2: 
Human Head Effigy Vessel, A.D. 1300-1500. Parkin Site, Arkansas. The Eugene and Clare Thaw Collection of American Indian Art.

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